Belknap Mountain

Named after Jeremy Belknap (1744–1798), a renowned preacher, historian, and author of  “The History of New Hampshire”.

Belknap Mtn. at 2382 ft. is the highest point in the county. Although of only modest elevation, the isolation of the Belknap Mountains gives Belknap Mtn. 1,850 ft. (560 m) of relative height above the low ground separating it from the White Mountains, making it one of the fifty most topographically prominent peaks in New England. Belknap Mtn. is flanked to the northwest by Gunstock Mountain, the site of the Gunstock Mountain Resort ski area.

Belknap Mountain stands within the watershed of the Merrimack River, which drains into the Gulf of Maine in the Atlantic. The east and northeast sides of Belknap Mtn. drain into Poorfarm Brook, thence into Lake Winnipesaukee, the Winnipesaukee River, and the Merrimack. The west side of Belknap Mtn. drains into Gunstock River, thence into Lake Winnipesaukee. The south side of Belknap Mtn. drains into Manning Lake, thence into Crystal Lake, the source of the Suncook River, and thence into the Merrimack River.

An active fire tower and new (2012) communications tower and building are located on the summit of Belknap Mtn. The fire tower is part of  the Statewide  Division of Forest & Lands  Fire Protection Bureau system and is manned during times of heightened fire danger (Class 3 – medium) or higher during the normal fire season April to Nov.

The communication tower is approximately 180 ft. high and provides microwave and radio service cell over a wide area.

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Much of this description is taken from Wikipedia. It has been supplemented by Hal Graham.